Kick Ass, Beat Them Down, Party On!

My grandfather is a huge proponent of the term “Might Makes Right.” He’s one of those tough old guys who lived through the Depression and WWII and walked uphill to school in the snow with no shoes on. You know, the kind that doesn’t think you need to go to the doctor unless you’ve been mauled by a bear.

Every now and then, when we have one of our family gatherings, Gramps will come over and sit down with me and retell all his stories. I, in turn, will tell him all about the new advances in technology, specifically how the Dreamcast is the wave of things to come. He’ll grumble and moan about how my generation should be tougher and not sit around wasting our minds and bodies with games like that. And in the end he will always add, “Remember, Mike. Might makes right.” I never really understood what he was trying to say until I came face to face with a problem a few weeks ago.

It was at a family gathering at my parent’s house. Nothing special, just one of those things where everyone comes over and stuffs their faces with all sorts of food, then sits down and falls asleep. I love those gatherings, mostly because stuffing myself, then being all fat and lazy are three of my favorite things to do in the world.

Anyway, my little cousins came over and, as usual, wanted to hang around with me because I’m the coolest one in the family. (Actually they are forced to hang around me because their parents say, “Go hang around with Mike.”) They know I have all the game systems and every game they could ever imagine, so all they want to do is play. I plugged in my Dreamcast and sat down to give them all a thorough thrashing.

Being a videogame geek, I know the games better than I know most other things, including women (much to my sorrow). Well, we started playing, and while I was holding my own at first, I soon started losing. I figured it was because I was all fat and lazy from the food, so I started to pay closer attention to what was going on. I was still losing. It was inconceivable to me that I could be beaten by kids not even in their teens yet. I couldn’t understand how they could be so good when the system is even younger than they are.

Then, in true preteen fashion, they began their taunts of, “you suck” and “loser!” and “why do you still live with your parents?” After a half-hour of this, I was about to go crazy. I was ready to kill the little beasties and blame it on some weird electrical shock, but that’s when my grandfather’s words echoed in my head.

“Remember, Mike. Might makes right.”

I smiled a truly evil smile then yanked the smartphone that I have and played Clash Royale because of the free gems. They whined, but I ignored it.

“It’s time to stop wasting away inside. Let’s go outside and play some real games,” I said.

We headed outside, and that was when the beatings commenced. In basketball, I stuffed their shots, stole their balls and accidentally knocked them to the ground while driving to the hoop. In baseball, when I wasn’t hitting homers, I was sliding into base which again, accidentally, knocked them down. In dodgeball, I won, mostly because they were way too scared to come anywhere near me when I had a ball. And in street hockey, I won, mostly because they somehow kept tripping over my stick.

After seeing my cousins all bruised and tired out from our real workout, I realized that Gramps was right. Might does make right. I got my ass kicked in the arena of videogames, but they didn’t stand a chance against me in the real world.

So, the moral of the story? Enjoy your videogames and learn to play them well, so you can beat all your opponents. But also get all big and strong, so when the real competitions come your way, you can kick ass there as well.

Mike planned to get into shape after writing this column but decided to test out a new Dreamcast game. He flopped down on his bed and hasn’t moved in over a week.

Clive Barker’s Undying – OVERVIEW

Your friend, Jeremiah Covenant, has called you to his giant spooky mansion to investigate the curse on his family. Your friend, Jeremiah Covenant, confesses that he once took his brothers and sisters down to a sinister ring of stones and read dark passages from a book not entirely unlike the Necronomicon, unleashing dark forces from beyond the Abyss that threatened the fabric of reality.

Your friend, Jeremiah Covenant, is a bit of a pillock.

Horror games have rarely gained much critical acclaim on the PC, despite the invaluable assistance of some of the worlds’ finest novelists, and we at Daily Radar UK are at a complete loss to explain why.

Meanwhile, in a top secret bunker…

Designer We’ve made a few crappy sub-games and put your name on the box. Any questions?

Clive Barker Can I have some money now?

One of the best was an adventure/FPS hybrid from Gremlin called Realms of the Haunting – an unsung classic, and probably more of an inspiration for Undying than Barker (who was a consultant on the project). However, unlike ROTH’s primitive Doom engine,Undying has the Unreal Tournament engine under its belt, and is easily one of the most promising scarefests on the PC to date.

Undying is an FPS in which you explore a variety of sinister locations, piecing together the detailed storyline and stopping the local monsters from tearing your face off. There are a few simple puzzles, but the bulk of the game involves getting from Point A to Point B in one piece. Although in many games this gets old fast, Undying’s ever thickening plot should keep the player’s attention, and the story is far deeper than most. The “Scrying” spell, always available, shows you a darker world behind the mundane one where paintings of young children change into cannibalistic demons, shrieks echo through rooms and sheets become stained with blood. These scenes, conversations and documents bring the plot very much to the fore, and regular visits from slobbering enemies and cruel ghosts keep your trigger finger primed…

Undying’s development team has done a superb job so far, with the monster designs especially good. The Howler is the first on the scene, a fast moving gremlin creature capable of jumping across huge distances in a single bound and, perhaps more importantly, ripping your throat out in a single swipe. Its fluid movement is a world away from Deus Ex’s lumbering characters, and the gunplay when you fight them is much more satisfying. Little touches appear throughout the game, with our favourite (read into this what you will) being the way that when you die your enemies finish the job like proper zombies – by ripping out your heart and chowing down on it. The levels are varied, ranging from the halls of Jeremiah’s estate to a horrible otherworld of ruin and depravation (we’ve always said that there aren’t enough games set in Milton Keynes) and although they are utterly linear they somehow manage to convey the feel of exploration.

We do have one major concern however. In its present state Undying is about as terrifying as a Clive Barker novel. Not the contents of one, the paperback itself. On a shelf. In Oxfam. Enemies show up exactly where you expect them to – you get so used to them sneaking up behind you whenever you step into a corridor that jogging backwards through the Covenant estate is the easiest way to stay alive. Much more careful use of light and shadow is required – Unreal is capable of some stunning effects that are woefully unused at the moment and would boost the atmosphere tremendously.

More fundamentally, Undying doesn’t seem sure whether it wants to be a tense, scary game or an action filled blaster – there aren’t really enough monsters for the latter, but after the first (very easy) section you are handed weapons with unlimited ammunition, two of which can be fired at once. Being chased through shadowy corridors to a safe spot by a fanged beast with no ammo and next to no health is scary. Knowing that you can spin around and melt it with ectoplasm at any point is not. And while we’re on the subject – ectoplasm? It’s the first spell that you acquire, and a bizarre choice. We’re aware that many folks went through a stage of wanting to be one of the Ghostbusters, but we doubt that they were thinking of Slimer…

Hopefully these worries will prove unfounded – Dreamworks has plenty of time to polish Undying, up before it hits the shelves, and it has both enormous potential and a capable team at the helm, so we’re optimistic. We’ll be back soon with the finished code, a full review and industrial strength brown pantaloons.

Deep story with Clive Barker’s seventh seal of approval
Unreal Tournament powered visuals
Powerful guns meet upgradable magic spells for a varied arsenal
Varied arsenal meets original monsters for muchos carnage and fast paced action
One of the bosses reminds us of Chris Evans. You can shoot him in the face. Excellent.

A complete history of the universe – the SCIENCE

Yes, it is a scrambled egg. But as you look at it, I hope you’ll begin to feel just slightly uneasy. Because you may notice that what’s actually happening is that the egg is unscrambling itself. And you’ll now see the yolk and the white have separated. And now they’re going to be poured back into the egg. And we all know in our heart of hearts that this is not the way the universe works. A scrambled egg is mush — tasty mush — but it’s mush. An egg is a beautiful, sophisticated thing that can create even more sophisticated things, such as chickens. And we know in our heart of hearts that the universe does not travel from mush to complexity. In fact, this gut instinct is reflected in one of the most fundamental laws of physics, the second law of thermodynamics, or the law of entropy. What that says basically is that the general tendency of the universe is to move from order and structure to lack of order, lack of structure — in fact, to mush. And that’s why that video feels a bit strange. And yet, look around us.

What we see around us is staggering complexity. Eric Beinhocker estimates that in New York City alone, there are some 10 billion SKUs, or distinct commodities, being traded. That’s hundreds of times as many species as there are on Earth. And they’re being traded by a species of almost seven billion individuals, who are linked by trade, travel, and the Internet into a global system of stupendous complexity. So here’s a great puzzle: in a universe ruled by the second law of thermodynamics, how is it possible to generate the sort of complexity I’ve described, the sort of complexity represented by you and me and the convention center? Well, the answer seems to be, the universe can create complexity, but with great difficulty. In pockets, there appear what my colleague, Fred Spier, calls “Goldilocks conditions” — not too hot, not too cold, just right for the creation of complexity. And slightly more complex things appear. And where you have slightly more complex things, you can get slightly more complex things.

And in this way, complexity builds stage by stage. Each stage is magical because it creates the impression of something utterly new appearing almost out of nowhere in the universe. We refer in big history to these moments as threshold moments. And at each threshold, the going gets tougher. The complex things get more fragile, more vulnerable; the Goldilocks conditions get more stringent, and it’s more difficult to create complexity. Now, we, as extremely complex creatures, desperately need to know this story of how the universe creates complexity despite the second law, and why complexity means vulnerability and fragility. And that’s the story that we tell in big history. But to do it, you have do something that may, at first sight, seem completely impossible. You have to survey the whole history of the universe. So let’s do it. (Laughter) Let’s begin by winding the timeline back 13.7 billion years, to the beginning of time. Around us, there’s nothing. There’s not even time or space. Imagine the darkest, emptiest thing you can and cube it a gazillion times and that’s where we are.

And then suddenly, bang! A universe appears, an entire universe. And we’ve crossed our first threshold. The universe is tiny; it’s smaller than an atom. It’s incredibly hot. It contains everything that’s in today’s universe, so you can imagine, it’s busting. And it’s expanding at incredible speed. And at first, it’s just a blur, but very quickly distinct things begin to appear in that blur. Within the first second, energy itself shatters into distinct forces including electromagnetism and gravity. And energy does something else quite magical: it congeals to form matter — quarks that will create protons and leptons that include electrons. And all of that happens in the first second. Now we move forward 380,000 years. That’s twice as long as humans have been on this planet.

And now simple atoms appear of hydrogen and helium. Now I want to pause for a moment, 380,000 years after the origins of the universe, because we actually know quite a lot about the universe at this stage. We know above all that it was extremely simple. It consisted of huge clouds of hydrogen and helium atoms, and they have no structure. They’re really a sort of cosmic mush. But that’s not completely true. Recent studies by satellites such as the WMAP satellite have shown that, in fact, there are just tiny differences in that background. What you see here, the blue areas are about a thousandth of a degree cooler than the red areas.

These are tiny differences, but it was enough for the universe to move on to the next stage of building complexity. And this is how it works. Gravity is more powerful where there’s more stuff. So where you get slightly denser areas, gravity starts compacting clouds of hydrogen and helium atoms. So we can imagine the early universe breaking up into a billion clouds. And each cloud is compacted, gravity gets more powerful as density increases, the temperature begins to rise at the center of each cloud, and then, at the center, the temperature crosses the threshold temperature of 10 million degrees, protons start to fuse, there’s a huge release of energy, and — bam! We have our first stars. From about 200 million years after the Big Bang, stars begin to appear all through the universe, billions of them. And the universe is now significantly more interesting and more complex.

Stars will create the Goldilocks conditions for crossing two new thresholds. When very large stars die, they create temperatures so high that protons begin to fuse in all sorts of exotic combinations, to form all the elements of the periodic table. If, like me, you’re wearing a gold ring, it was forged in a supernova explosion. So now the universe is chemically more complex. And in a chemically more complex universe, it’s possible to make more things. And what starts happening is that, around young suns, young stars, all these elements combine, they swirl around, the energy of the star stirs them around, they form particles, they form snowflakes, they form little dust motes, they form rocks, they form asteroids, and eventually, they form planets and moons. And that is how our solar system was formed, four and a half billion years ago. Rocky planets like our Earth are significantly more complex than stars because they contain a much greater diversity of materials.

So we’ve crossed a fourth threshold of complexity. Now, the going gets tougher. The next stage introduces entities that are significantly more fragile, significantly more vulnerable, but they’re also much more creative and much more capable of generating further complexity. I’m talking, of course, about living organisms. Living organisms are created by chemistry. We are huge packages of chemicals. So, chemistry is dominated by the electromagnetic force. That operates over smaller scales than gravity, which explains why you and I are smaller than stars or planets. Now, what are the ideal conditions for chemistry? What are the Goldilocks conditions? Well, first, you need energy, but not too much. In the center of a star, there’s so much energy that any atoms that combine will just get busted apart again. But not too little. In intergalactic space, there’s so little energy that atoms can’t combine.

What you want is just the right amount, and planets, it turns out, are just right, because they’re close to stars, but not too close. You also need a great diversity of chemical elements, and you need liquids, such as water. Why? Well, in gases, atoms move past each other so fast that they can’t hitch up. In solids, atoms are stuck together, they can’t move. In liquids, they can cruise and cuddle and link up to form molecules. Now, where do you find such Goldilocks conditions? Well, planets are great, and our early Earth was almost perfect. It was just the right distance from its star to contain huge oceans of liquid water. And deep beneath those oceans, at cracks in the Earth’s crust, you’ve got heat seeping up from inside the Earth, and you’ve got a great diversity of elements.

So at those deep oceanic vents, fantastic chemistry began to happen, and atoms combined in all sorts of exotic combinations. But of course, life is more than just exotic chemistry. How do you stabilize those huge molecules that seem to be viable? Well, it’s here that life introduces an entirely new trick. You don’t stabilize the individual; you stabilize the template, the thing that carries information, and you allow the template to copy itself. And DNA, of course, is the beautiful molecule that contains that information. You’ll be familiar with the double helix of DNA. Each rung contains information. So, DNA contains information about how to make living organisms. And DNA also copies itself. So, it copies itself and scatters the templates through the ocean.

So the information spreads. Notice that information has become part of our story. The real beauty of DNA though is in its imperfections. As it copies itself, once in every billion rungs, there tends to be an error. And what that means is that DNA is, in effect, learning. It’s accumulating new ways of making living organisms because some of those errors work. So DNA’s learning and it’s building greater diversity and greater complexity. And we can see this happening over the last four billion years. For most of that time of life on Earth, living organisms have been relatively simple — single cells. But they had great diversity, and, inside, great complexity.

Then from about 600 to 800 million years ago, multi-celled organisms appear. You get fungi, you get fish, you get plants, you get amphibia, you get reptiles, and then, of course, you get the dinosaurs. And occasionally, there are disasters. Sixty-five million years ago, an asteroid landed on Earth near the Yucatan Peninsula, creating conditions equivalent to those of a nuclear war, and the dinosaurs were wiped out. Terrible news for the dinosaurs, but great news for our mammalian ancestors, who flourished in the niches left empty by the dinosaurs. And we human beings are part of that creative evolutionary pulse that began 65 million years ago with the landing of an asteroid. Humans appeared about 200,000 years ago. And I believe we count as a threshold in this great story. Let me explain why. We’ve seen that DNA learns in a sense, it accumulates information.

But it is so slow. DNA accumulates information through random errors, some of which just happen to work. But DNA had actually generated a faster way of learning: it had produced organisms with brains, and those organisms can learn in real time. They accumulate information, they learn. The sad thing is, when they die, the information dies with them. Now what makes humans different is human language. We are blessed with a language, a system of communication, so powerful and so precise that we can share what we’ve learned with such precision that it can accumulate in the collective memory. And that means it can outlast the individuals who learned that information, and it can accumulate from generation to generation. And that’s why, as a species, we’re so creative and so powerful, and that’s why we have a history. We seem to be the only species in four billion years to have this gift.

I call this ability collective learning. It’s what makes us different. We can see it at work in the earliest stages of human history. We evolved as a species in the savanna lands of Africa, but then you see humans migrating into new environments, into desert lands, into jungles, into the Ice Age tundra of Siberia — tough, tough environment — into the Americas, into Australasia. Each migration involved learning — learning new ways of exploiting the environment, new ways of dealing with their surroundings. Then 10,000 years ago, exploiting a sudden change in global climate with the end of the last ice age, humans learned to farm.

Farming was an energy bonanza. And exploiting that energy, human populations multiplied. Human societies got larger, denser, more interconnected. And then from about 500 years ago, humans began to link up globally through shipping, through trains, through telegraph, through the Internet, until now we seem to form a single global brain of almost seven billion individuals. And that brain is learning at warp speed. And in the last 200 years, something else has happened. We’ve stumbled on another energy bonanza in fossil fuels. So fossil fuels and collective learning together explain the staggering complexity we see around us. So — Here we are, back at the convention center. We’ve been on a journey, a return journey, of 13.7 billion years.

I hope you agree this is a powerful story. And it’s a story in which humans play an astonishing and creative role. But it also contains warnings. Collective learning is a very, very powerful force, and it’s not clear that we humans are in charge of it. I remember very vividly as a child growing up in England, living through the Cuban Missile Crisis. For a few days, the entire biosphere seemed to be on the verge of destruction. And the same weapons are still here, and they are still armed. If we avoid that trap, others are waiting for us. We’re burning fossil fuels at such a rate that we seem to be undermining the Goldilocks conditions that made it possible for human civilizations to flourish over the last 10,000 years. So what big history can do is show us the nature of our complexity and fragility and the dangers that face us, but it can also show us our power with collective learning.

And now, finally — this is what I want. I want my grandson, Daniel, and his friends and his generation, throughout the world, to know the story of big history, and to know it so well that they understand both the challenges that face us and the opportunities that face us. And that’s why a group of us are building a free, online syllabus in big history for high-school students throughout the world. We believe that big history will be a vital intellectual tool for them, as Daniel and his generation face the huge challenges and also the huge opportunities ahead of them at this threshold moment in the history of our beautiful planet.

The Extraordinary Game Never Alone

One of the popular game of the year would be the “Never Alone” this game is extra ordinary and it’s a kind of game that you want to like for more. The creator for this game they somewhat collaborate some game scenario and style like the Alaskan natives and the people of Alaskan that somewhat indigenous that somewhat leave in the isolated area. The people has gentle ways of manners and has a bit dark history, in this game you will start with a young girl Inuit, her journey is to find and locate her lost family and she somehow travel around the some hazardous terrain and a life threatening path but she overcome it all because she have a company that help her to travel around.

Through the game you will gain or acquire some item or a box that filled with memories and loads of sentimental memories for her family. Never Alone game bring to its core of video game and it can played to PS3, Xbox One and PC version. This game is awesome in graphics and the visual effect it is totally sumptuous fascinating. When you go deeper down the game you will certainly encounter some packed snow drifts and also the ice- covered caves and this kind of path way somewhat cool and awesome. Great game like SimCity Buildit is being featured at simcitybuildithack.net. You will find some desolate remains of the villages and town that somewhat filled with terrifying ambience in the air and the place is somewhat rick and damage.

Some area in the game you will encounter numerous ghost or spirits that is malevolent, they somehow appear in the screen and that they seems like a frozen painting within the icy air.

When it come to its story, this is some compelling and it is hard to escape in death like a polar bear who tries to kill you but you have to get make away just to avoid to the bear. As she takes the journey he will encounter some friends on her way. Nuna is one of the main characters in the story. As Nuna headed home or turn back home her entire village where somewhat burn down to ashes and the one who burn it down is the Ogre and Nuna fled herself to escape from the ogre and she somewhat lost her way and find herself in the Arctic Tundra. And this moment that she desperately want to find her family.

The Brilliance Displayed by a Game Called Hay Day

The arrival of one of the most anticipated titles of the past few years seems to be something akin to a gaming epiphany, so to speak. Amid rumor, bad news and confusion, SuperCell’s strange week in the videogame industry spotlight reveals nothing except that this is one company that knows games and gamers, even if everything else is up in the air.

What game are we talking about? Hay Day, of course. With its ambitious goal of taking mobile gamers to places that only PC players had been previously (online), developer Supercell has gloriously succeeded in full 3D — with vibrant, colorful textures to boot. Taking an obvious page from the premier simulators, multiplayer antics of previous series, Hay Day, in fact, more refines a formula than redefines a genre.

While countless previews have hit the web and print magazines outlining its general mechanics and gameplay, for the uninitiated, Hay Day is a farming simulation game that can either be played online.

Prepare for an overload the minute you plunge into an online room filled with Hay Day-obsessed folk speaking every language and eager to level up their characters just like you. Navigation and signing up for game is amazingly easy for first-timers, but you’ll have to contend with some strangely delayed character rendering and the annoying habit of speech “bubbles” clogging up your screen if there are tons of people in the lobby.

The structure of the game is this: to grow up a farm from scratch.But there’s a downside to every group experience, virtual or physical. Grabbing diamonds sometimes boils down to who gets to them the fastest, but this is also part of the strategy in Hay Day. Open new window for more information on Hay Day and its updated hack.

SuperCell has done a commendable job giving gamers all sorts of ways to communicate with one another, be it simple mail, cards or universal “translators.” While the universal bit doesn’t work as smoothly as we’d hoped (it makes gamers scroll through a clumsy network of preset phrases), the effort is definitely there and makes asking someone who doesn’t speak English “Where are you from?” easier than breaking out a foreign-language dictionary.

Though Sega has pulled off the unthinkable feat of placing a high-quality online farming simulation game, the project doesn’t come off without a few hitches. Yes, Hay Day does have a lot of slowdown that occurs during big farm maps with loads of elements and players running around. Yes, there is lag that will really confuse players who see their friends appearing and reappearing at odd locations on the screen. Yes, there are instances of hard crashes and soft crashes that will boot you off the server so you’ll have reconnect. Yes, the game could use more diversity in its farm designs and more brain-work in its overly simplistic “step on this switch and have a friend step on the other” puzzles

BUT (and it’s a big “but”) this is a game that’s so expertly constructed in its pick up ‘n’ play controls, mechanics, simple but well-plotted systems and painfully gorgeous graphics (SuperCell clearly gets something out of the DC that loads of other third parties can’t seem to figure out) that it’s best to keep your opinions to yourself until you’ve played it online. Then, make up your mind whether you want to trash the game (probably not) or keep playing and get your farm to level 62. For most gamers, the answer is the latter. With a high addiction factor and groundbreaking console design, this isn’t a game that any mobile owner should pass up. And it stands as a testament, flaws and all, that SuperCell, no matter what it decides to do in the future or how it’s gonna do it, is delivering the content that will dictate what most gamers will see on other systems for years to come.

Last Blade 2 – Final Edition

If you haven’t got three-and-a-half hundred notes to spend on The King of Fighters 2000 for Neo Geo Cart, do the next best thing and check this out.
If you own a Dreamcast, you’re probably sick to the back teeth of beat’em ups by now.

Well, get used to them, as there’s plenty more on the way. Project Justice, Fighting Vipers 2, Guilty Gear X all of which are very, very fine examples of the genre, but anyone that’s experienced the canny delights of an Neo Geo brawler will tell you it’s sublime stuff. SNK is a rule unto itself and it doesn’t give a crap how anyone else does things – fact is, they invented a lot of it.  Fifa Mobile Soccer is no exception. Just don’t play it green.

Typically, it’s the visuals that give you an indication of how good or bad a fighting game’s going to be. Yeah, how it plays is important, obviously, but we’re far more inclined to be ingratiated to a developer that has spent time on its artwork. This doesn’t seem to be the case with Last Blade 2. SNK is still using hardware from 1989, namely its MVS set up, so expect 16-Bit graphics. Bizarrely, Dreamcast is about the only console that can keep up with its 2D prowess, SNK’s hardware light years ahead of the competition, for the time. Ultimately, things look a little rough. It’s not terrible, but the animation is scant and compared to the over-quoted Guilty Gear X, low-res and jagged sprites just don’t do the game justice, which is a shame, because the designs are fantastic, absorbing a style that seems derived from 19th-century China. Flowing robes and circular hats complement such backdrops as Wadamaya Tea House and Cherry-Blossom Party. The beauty is there – the execution is dated.

Which is bullshit, really, because the game is extraordinary Pick from a de rigeur selection of armed characters – sluggish but powerful, lithe and quick, demonic or heroic. The only one we can’t fathom is the supremely camp Elvis look-a-like wearing a pink dressing gown. Gay or not, he’s a tough nut, a theme that seems to run throughout the entire game. Without tweaking the options to your advantage, Last Blade 2 is rock hard. Correction, it’s double-hardcore. If you don’t know your reversals from your supers, you’re done for. SNK expects you to be at one with the system, at one with the game. Passing even the first level can be tricky, but there is an option for you to restart the match with your enemy’s health bar the same as when they beat you last. This means that you’ll eventually manage to vanquish them, if not through any skill of your own.

The real clever part is the designation factor, however, which lets you pick from three ‘weights’ every time you fight. Speed allows you to increase the velocity of your character’s actions, Power lets you use the Desperation and Super Desperation moves and EX is a combination of both – albeit with a handicap that means severe damage every time you take a hit. Learning to utilise the correct weight with the correct character is the key to mastering Last Blade 2, not forgetting all the usual Cancellations, Specials, Charge Attacks, Combos and Mid-Air Blocks.

Just dipping into the Jap preview copy is enough to scare anyone who hasn’t had years of practice learning the art of digital fisticuffs. Essentially, though, it’s a moot point – Last Blade 2 is looking awesome. Roll on the PAL version.